Définition Peel | dictionnaire anglais définition synonymes Reverso

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peel  

[3]  
      n   (in Britain) a fortified tower of the 16th century on the borders between England and Scotland, built to withstand raids  
     (C14 (fence made of stakes): from Old French piel stake, from Latin palus; see pale2, paling)  
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Collins
peel   [1]  
      vb  
1    tr   to remove (the skin, rind, outer covering, etc.) of (a fruit, egg, etc.)  
2    intr   (of paint, etc.) to be removed from a surface, esp. through weathering  
3    intr   (of a surface) to lose its outer covering of paint, etc. esp. through weathering  
4    intr   (of a person or part of the body) to shed skin in flakes or (of skin) to be shed in flakes, esp. as a result of sunburn  
5      (Croquet)   to put (another player's ball) through a hoop or hoops  
6    keep one's eyes peeled (or skinned)   to watch vigilantly  
      n  
7    the skin or rind of a fruit, etc.,   (See also)        peel off  
     (Old English pilian to strip off the outer layer, from Latin pilare to make bald, from pilus a hair)  

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Collins
peel   [2]  
      n   a long-handled shovel used by bakers for moving bread, in an oven  
     (C14 pele, from Old French, from Latin pala spade, from pangere to drive in; see palette)  

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Collins
Peel  
      n   Sir Robert. 1788--1850, British statesman; Conservative prime minister (1834--35; 1841--46). As Home Secretary (1828--30) he founded the Metropolitan Police and in his second ministry carried through a series of free-trade budgets culminating in the repeal of the Corn Laws (1846), which split the Tory party  
  Peelite      n  


orange peel  
      n  
1    the thick pitted rind of an orange  
2    anything resembling this in surface texture, such as skin or porcelain  
orange-peel fungus  
      n      See       elf-cup  
peel   [1]  
      vb  
1    tr   to remove (the skin, rind, outer covering, etc.) of (a fruit, egg, etc.)  
2    intr   (of paint, etc.) to be removed from a surface, esp. through weathering  
3    intr   (of a surface) to lose its outer covering of paint, etc. esp. through weathering  
4    intr   (of a person or part of the body) to shed skin in flakes or (of skin) to be shed in flakes, esp. as a result of sunburn  
5      (Croquet)   to put (another player's ball) through a hoop or hoops  
6    keep one's eyes peeled (or skinned)   to watch vigilantly  
      n  
7    the skin or rind of a fruit, etc.,   (See also)        peel off  
     (Old English pilian to strip off the outer layer, from Latin pilare to make bald, from pilus a hair)  
peel   [2]  
      n   a long-handled shovel used by bakers for moving bread, in an oven  
     (C14 pele, from Old French, from Latin pala spade, from pangere to drive in; see palette)  
peel   [3]  
      n   (in Britain) a fortified tower of the 16th century on the borders between England and Scotland, built to withstand raids  
     (C14 (fence made of stakes): from Old French piel stake, from Latin palus; see pale2, paling)  
peel off  
      vb   adv  
1    to remove or be removed by peeling  
2    intr  
Slang   to undress  
3    intr   (of an aircraft) to turn away as by banking, and leave a formation  
4    Slang   to go away or cause to go away  

Dictionnaire anglais Collins English definition-Thesaurus  

Collins

peel  

1   
      vb   decorticate, desquamate, flake off, pare, scale, skin, strip off  
2   
      n   epicarp, exocarp, peeling, rind, skin  

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Dictionnaire Collaboratif     Anglais Definition
n.
crust, epicarp, husk, integument, outer layer, peel, skin

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