Traduction pull on pants | Dictionnaire Anglais-Français

Collins

pull

  
      vt  
   (=tug)  
  [+rope, hair]  
tirer  
  [+handle, door]  
tirer  
→ She pulled the door towards her.        
→ Pull the handle to ring the bell.        
  [+cart, carriage]   tirer  
→ a freight train pulling wagons        
→ In those days, horses still pulled the ploughs.        
→ He pulls a rickshaw.        
→ The van was pulling a heavy trailer.        
Someone pulled her hair.      Quelqu'un lui a tiré les cheveux.  
to pull a door open      ouvrir une porte en tirant  
to pull sth out of sth, She pulled her feet out of the wet boots.      Elle retira ses bottes mouillées.  
He pulled his arms out of the sleeves.      Il sortit ses bras des manches.  
to pull sb out of sth, I helped pull him out of the water.      J'ai aidé à le sortir de l'eau.  
to pull sth to pieces, to pull sth to bits        [+object, toy]   mettre qch en pièces  
   (=criticize)  
  [+argument, statement, piece of work]  
démolir  
→ The critics pulled the play to pieces.        
→ My tutor pulled my essay to pieces.        
to pull sb's leg      (=tease)   faire marcher qn  
→ Don't take any notice of him. He's pulling your leg.        
→ Of course I won't tell him. I was only pulling your leg.        
You're pulling my leg!      Tu me fais marcher!  
pull the other one!, pull the other one, it's got bells on!        (British)  
*   à d'autres !  
to pull strings      (=use one's influence)   tirer des ficelles  
Can't you pull a few strings and get me a job at your office?      Tu peux tirer quelques ficelles et m'obtenir un travail à ton bureau?  
to pull strings for sb      (=use one's influence)   intervenir en faveur de qn  
→ Tony is sure he can pull a few strings for you and get you a ticket.        
to pull one's weight      faire sa part (de travail)  
→ Lynn got cross with Craig for not pulling his weight.        
→ I hope I pulled my weight - I would not want to be let off because of my age        
   (=close)  
  [+curtain, blind]  
tirer  
→ Can you pull the curtain? The sun's too strong.        
→ He pulled the blinds to shut out the sight of the rain.        
     [+trigger]   appuyer sur  
→ Suddenly, he pulled the trigger.        
   (=strain)  
  [+muscle, tendon]  
se froisser  
→ Dave pulled a back muscle and could barely kick the ball.        
→ He suffered a pulled calf muscle.        
I pulled a muscle when I was training.      Je me suis froissé un muscle à l'entraînement.  
to pull a hamstring      se claquer, se faire un claquage  
  
    face  
   (=attract)  
  [+visitors, audience, voters]  
attirer  
→ It's something that should really pull the public.        
to pull a crowd      attirer les foules  
→ The organizers have to employ the best performers to pull a crowd.        
   *  
  [+sexual partner]  
lever *     
→ He always manages to pull a girl at the disco.        
     [+beer]   tirer  
→ pulling pints and opening bottles of beer        
      vi   (=tug)   tirer  
→ Pull as hard as you can.        
pull!      tirez!  
"Pull"        (on door)    "Tirez"  
to pull with all one's strength      tirer de toutes ses forces  
→ He hoisted the rope over the branch and pulled with all his strength.        
      n  
     (PHYSICS)   [+moon, magnet]   attraction    f     
→ The tides are caused by the pull of the moon.        
[+current, gravity]   force    f     
→ He swam towards the centre of the river, feeling the pull of the current.        
the pull of gravity      la force de gravité  
     (fig)  
[+homeland, idea, the past]  
attrait    m     
→ The pull of her career remains strong.        
The idea of living in Paris still had a strong pull.      L'idée de vivre à Paris présentait toujours un fort attrait.  
the pull of the past      l'attrait du passé  
→ No matter how much you feel the pull of the past, make a determined effort to look to the future.        
   (=tug)  
to give sth a pull      tirer sur qch  
→ He gave the handle a sharp pull.        
→ She gave the hem of her skirt a pull.        


pull about  
      vt sep     (British)   (=handle roughly)  
  [+person]  
malmener  
pull apart  
      vt sep  
   (=separate)   séparer  
→ I rushed in and tried to pull the dogs apart.        
→ I had to pull the boys apart before one of them got badly hurt.        
   (=pull to pieces)  
  [+object, body]  
mettre en pièces  
→ Their bodies had been pulled apart by scavengers such as crows, dogs and foxes.        
   (=criticize)  
  [+argument, statement, piece of work]  
démolir  
pull away  
      vi  
   [vehicle, train]   démarrer  
[driver]  
s'éloigner  
→ I stood in the driveway and watched him pull away.        
to pull away from sth      s'éloigner de qch  
The car pulled away from the kerb.      La voiture s'éloigna du trottoir.  
     (to free o.s, physically)    se dégager  
to pull away from sb      se dégager de l'étreinte de qn  
She pulled away from him.      Elle se dégagea de son étreinte.  
   (=cut one's ties)     (mentally)    s'éloigner  
to pull away from sb      s'éloigner de qn  
→ The Soviet Union began pulling away from Cuba.        
→ Daughters tend to pull away from their mothers as they get older.        
pull back  
      vi  
   (=retreat)  
[troops]  
se retirer  
to pull back from        [+position]   se retirer de  
→ They were asked to pull back from their artillery positions around the city.        
   (=change one's mind)   faire marche arrière  
→ The government threatened to make public its disquiet but then pulled back.        
→ I was going to tell him what I thought, but at the last moment I pulled back.        
pull down  
      vt sep  
     [+trousers]   baisser  
  [+blind]  
baisser  
to pull one's skirt down over one's knees      tirer sur sa jupe pour couvrir ses genoux  
     [+person]   jeter à terre  
His attacker pulled him down.      Son assaillant le jeta à terre.  
   (=demolish)  
  [+house, building]  
démolir  
→ They'd pulled down the cinema which then left an open space.        
→ The plan was to pull the old library down.        
  [+statue]   déboulonner, abattre  
→ A small crowd attempted to pull down a statue.        
  [+tree]   abattre  
pull in  
      vi  
     (to kerb)   
[vehicle, driver]  
se ranger  
→ He pulled in at the side of the road.        
→ The van pulled in and waited.        
   [train]     (into station)    entrer en gare  
→ As the Orient Express pulled in, it was greeted by excited crowds.        
      vt sep  
   (=attract)  
  [+visitors, audience, crowd]  
attirer  
→ Higher wages in the cities pull in the unemployed from the country.        
→ They're a big team and really pull in the crowds.        
→ The festival pulls in a lot of tourists.        
   (=pick up, arrest)  
  [+criminal, suspect]  
arrêter  
→ The police pulled him in for questioning.        
→ He was pulled in for drink driving.        
   *  
(=earn)  

  [+money]  
se faire  
→ He's pulling in about twenty thousand a year.        
pull off  
      vt sep  
     [+clothes, shoes]   retirer  
→ He pulled off his wet shoes and socks.        
→ She pulled the girl's jumper off.        
→ Can you help me pull my boots off?        
   (=be successful in)  
  [+deal]  
conclure  
→ The markets expect him to attempt to pull off a big deal before he retires.        
  [+victory]   arracher  
The underdogs pulled off a remarkable victory.      Les outsiders ont arraché une remarquable victoire.  
to pull it off      (=be successful)   réussir son coup  
→ It will be a very fine victory if they pull it off.        
→ If I can pull it off, I'll have three whole weeks' holiday in the summer.        
pull out  
      vi  
     (from kerb)   
[vehicle]  
démarrer  
[person]  

She pulled out into the street.      Sa voiture s'enfila dans la rue.  
     (from station)   
[train]  
démarrer  
→ The train was just pulling out when they arrived.        
   (=change lane)  
[vehicle]  
déboîter  
→ The lorry pulled out in front of me.        
→ He was about to pull out to overtake the guy in front of him.        
The car pulled out to overtake.      La voiture a déboîté pour doubler.  
   (=withdraw)     (from competition, project, agreement)    se retirer  
→ You have to pay a 10% deposit which you lose if you pull out before completion.        
to pull out of sth        [+competition, project, agreement]   se retirer de qch  
→ The World Bank should pull out of the project.        
→ France was going to pull out of NATO.        
→ The reigning World Champion has pulled out of the competition.        
She pulled out of the tournament.      Elle s'est retirée du tournoi.  
   (=withdraw)  
[troops]  
se retirer  
to pull out of      se retirer de  
→ The militia in Lebanon has agreed to pull out of Beirut.        
      vt sep  
   (=take out)   sortir  
She pulled out a gun.      Elle sortit un pistolet.  
   (=extract)  
  [+tooth]  
arracher  
  [+cork]  
extraire
   (=withdraw)  
  [+athlete]  
  (from competition, training session)    retirer  
→ Arsene Wenger, the Arsenal manager, threatened to pull his team out of their pre-season tour of Austria.        
→ The other day we had to pull him out of a training session halfway through        
→ Botha was supposed to have fought Wayne McCullough in Atlantic City at the Weekend. However, he was pulled out of his scheduled bout.        
   (=withdraw)  
  [+troops]  
retirer  
pull over  
      vi  
[vehicle, driver]  
se ranger  
→ The car pulled over to the side of the road.        
→ I pulled over to let the fire engine pass.        
      vt sep  
   (=drag)   tirer  
He pulled the table over to the window.      Il tira la table jusqu'à la fenêtre.  
   (=stop)  
[police]  

  [+motorist]  
contraindre à s'arrêter  
→ The police pulled him over.        
→ The officers pulled him over after a high-speed chase.        
pull round  
      vi  
   [unconscious person]   revenir à soi
   [sick person]   se rétablir  
pull through  
      vi  
     (from illness)    s'en sortir  
They think he'll pull through.      Ils pensent qu'il va s'en sortir.  
     (from difficulties)    s'en sortir  
→ There are signs, though, that he has the talent to pull through.        
pull together  
      vi   (=cooperate)   se serrer les coudes  
→ They would be far better off, emotionally, if they all pulled together.        
→ In times of crisis, we all need to pull together.        
→ The nation was urged to pull together to avoid a slide into complete chaos.        
      vt sep  
to pull o.s. together      se ressaisir  
→ Pull yourself together now and stop this at once.        
→ She made an effort to pull herself together before going into the room.        
pull up  
      vi  
   (=stop)  
[vehicle]  
s'arrêter  
→ The cab pulled up and the driver jumped out.        
→ He pulled up in front of the restaurant.        
A black car pulled up beside me.      Une voiture noire s'est arrêtée à côté de moi.  
      vt sep  
  [+trousers, socks]  
remonter  
→ He pulled up his socks and put on his shoes.        
→ Pulling up his trousers, he walked away.        
   (=uproot)  
  [+plant, weed]  
arracher  
→ We spent the afternoon pulling up weeds.        
→ She'd accidentally pulled up some of Alan's young plants.        
   to pull up a chair      prendre une chaise  
→ Pull up a chair and join us for a coffee.        
→ She pulled up a chair and sat with them by the fire.        
   (=stop)  
[police]  

  [+vehicle, driver]  
arrêter  
pull-down menu  
      n     (COMPUTING)   menu    m   déroulant  
pull-in   ,   (British)   pull-off     (US)  
      n   parking    m     
pull-out  
      n  
   (=withdrawal)  
[+forces, troops]  
retrait    m  
     (in magazine)    supplément    m   détachable
      modif  
[magazine, pages]  
détachable  
ring-pull  
      n     (British, on can)   anneau    m   (d'ouverture)
Traduction Dictionnaire Collins Anglais - Francais  
Dictionnaire Collaboratif     Anglais-Français
vt.
mettre
n.
pantalons
n.
traction
v.
tirer
exp.
tirez!
n.
mini-short
n.
fuseau de ski
"pull on pants" : exemples et traductions en contexte
I.N.C INTERNATIONAL CONCEPTS Petites Seamed Pull On Pants I.N.C INTERNATIONAL CONCEPTS Pantalon fourreau profilé pour petites tailles
Soft pull-on pants with elasticized waist. Pantalon fourreau doux à taille élastique.
I.N.C INTERNATIONAL CONCEPTS Seamed Pull-On Pants I.N.C INTERNATIONAL CONCEPTS Pantalon fourreau profilé
Pull-on pants with elasticized waist. Pantalon fourreau à taille élastique.
Easy for mom and soft for her, these essential pull-on pants keep you prepared for the unexpected. Pratique pour maman et doux pour bébé, ce pantalon fourreau vous permet d'être parée à toute éventualité.
GUESS Two Piece Set Logo Pull-On Pants GUESS Ensemble pantalon fourreau deux pièces avec logo
Voir plus d'exemples de traduction Anglais-Français en contexte pour “pull on pants

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